About the College - College of Education, Health and Human Development - University of Canterbury - New Zealand

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College of Education, Health and Human Development

About the College

The University of Canterbury College of Education, Health and Human Development incorporates the former Christchurch College of Education, Health and Human Development and the University's School of Education.

Founded in 1877, the Christchurch College of Education, Health and Human Development had a distinguished history of excellence in teacher education. Throughout its 131 years, the College was well known for the quality delivery of teacher education - from early childhood, primary and secondary pre-service teacher education, through to professional development and support services for teachers. More recent was the addition of a coach education programme, and a variety of community courses such as studies in children's literature.

The University's School of Education traces its origins to 1904. With the appointment of the first professor in 1920, the study of education as a liberal arts discipline was cemented within the University of Canterbury. The development of a strong research culture led to significant contributions being made to education nationally and internationally. Over the ensuing decades, the addition of child and family psychology, counselling, and policy courses extended the range of study options. Thus, the merger of the College with the University in 2007 provided an opportunity to develop a centre of excellence, leadership, and innovation in multidisciplinary research and professional education.

UNESCO - Teacher Education towards Sustainability

In 2014 the University of Canterbury, College of Education, Health and Human Development, welcomed the opportunity to be a partner in the UNESCO Teacher Education Network for Reorienting Teacher Education towards Sustainability. The College of Education, Health and Human Development recognises the vital role teacher education plays in the international community and the potential it has to bring about change within educational systems that will shape the knowledge, skills, and dispositions of future generations (UNESCO Shaping the Future). Teacher education programmes at the College of Education, Health and Human Development are now focused on realising the vision of the UNESCO Global Action Plan.